How to Install a Whole House Water Filter

Whether your water comes from a well or from a municipal water supply, you want it to be clear, you want it to be clean, and you want it to taste good. But that’s not always the case. So what can you do besides stocking up on bottled water or spending a fortune on a state-of-the-art water purification system? You can install a whole-house water filter that will provide clean, clear water for all of your household needs.

Tools

Steps

  1. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 1

    Wrap Teflon tape around the treads of the pipe fitting.

  2. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 2

    Screw the fittings into the head cap and secure tightly with an adjustable wrench.

  3. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 3

    Before installing the filter, turn off the water supply.

  4. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 4

    Turn on a faucet to relieve pressure in the line.

  5. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 5

    Determine the best place to install the filter.

  6. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 6

    If your pipes don’t have slack, slip joint push fittings are needed to ensure the ends of the pipe and water filter make a secure connection.

  7. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 7

    Cut out a section of the pipe using a tube cutter, depending on the type of pipes you have. Place a bucket underneath to catch remaining water.

  8. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 8

    Sand the burrs off the end of the fixed pipe, which is the one we won’t be cutting off.

  9. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 9

    Insert the push fitting on one side of the filter assembly into the pipe as far as it will go, approximately 1”.

  10. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 10

    Cut and sand a 3″-4″ length of pipe. Push it into one of the slip joint fittings.

  11. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 11

    Hold the slip joint up to the pipe to get an approximate measurement of where you need to cut the pipe on the other side of the assembly.

  12. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 12

    Cut the pipe with the tube cutter and then sand the burrs off the end.

  13. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 13

    Push the slip joint onto the pipe as far as you can.

  14. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 14

    While pressing the disconnect clip against the release collar on the slip end of the fitting, slide the fitting onto the other pipe so the short copper tube goes into the assembly push fitting to a depth of 1”.

  15. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 15

    For grounded electrical system, install a copper jumper wire, using clamps to fasten them.

  16. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 16

    Install the filter within the container. This will need to be changed out occasionally.

  17. How to Install Whole House Water Heater - Step 17

    Turn the water supply back on.


Read Video Transcript

Whether your water comes from a well or from a municipal water supply, you want it to be clear, you want it to be clean, and you want it to taste good. But that’s not always the case. So what can you do besides stocking up on bottled water or spending a fortune on a state-of-the-art water purification system? You can install a whole-house water filter that will provide clean, clear water for all of your household needs.

Today we’re going to install this whole house water filter. First, we’ll determine the best place to put it, taking into consideration the configuration of our home’s water supply lines. Then we’ll discuss the different types of filters that can be used with our system and the different degrees of filtration for each. So let’s get started.

First, let’s remove the unit from the packaging to make sure we have all of the parts. This whole-house filter consists of a head cap with a built-in shut-off valve, an O ring, the clear cartridge housing and a cartridge wrench.

Now let’s do a little pre-assembly. First, we’ll wrap Teflon® tape in a clockwise direction around the threads of these two ¾” male threaded push fittings that we picked up at our local independent home improvement retailer. Then we’ll screw the fittings into the head cap and tighten firmly with an adjustable wrench, being careful not to over-tighten. We chose male threaded push fittings for our installation because they are so easy to use and don’t require soldering. We could have also used this ¾” mail threaded copper compression fitting, but we would have had to solder the ends to the existing water lines. If you are unsure, or if you have PEX or CPVC plumbing lines, check with your local independent home improvement retailer for the fittings that best fit your particular application.

Before installing the unit, you need to turn off the water supply and open a faucet to relieve pressure in the line. Then determine the best place to put the filter. This takes a little investigative work on your part, and an understanding of how water flows into the house from the well or municipal supply line outside. We chose this spot because it’s located upstream from the water heater, but downstream of the lines supplying both outdoor spigots. We don’t need filtered water outdoor use. This spot also makes sense because of its proximity over our utility sink, which will come in handy during filter changes. We’re installing our filter on a water line near the ceiling so we’ll have plenty of room to remove the cartridge for filter changes. This filter can be installed on virtually any horizontal water line. Just make sure you leave 1-1/2” clearance below the housing to be able to unscrew it to replace the filters.

If we had slack in our copper water line, for example as we would have had if we would have positioned our filter near this braided hose, we could cut out a section of copper pipe the length of the assembly then move the enough to push the pipe ends into the push fittings. But we don’t have any slack in the lines, so we have to use a slip joint push fitting, such as these, which we used in earlier projects for the same reason. A slip joint push fitting allows the pipe to be moved just enough to push the ends into the assembly.

We’ll begin by making our first cut in the existing water line using this copper tube cutter. You may want to have a bucket and some towels handy. It might take several minutes to drain the line. Next, sand the burrs off the end of the fixed pipe, which is the one we won’t be cutting off. See how the pipe is shiny at the end? That’s what we want. Insert the push fitting on one side of the filter assembly into the pipe as far as it will go, approximately 1”. After cutting a 3” or 4” length of copper pipe and sanding the burrs off both ends, we’ll push one end into the non-slip side of our sip joint push fitting. Hold the slip joint up to the pipe to get an approximate measurement of where you need to cut the pipe on the other side of the assembly. At about the center point of the slip joint, mark the pipe. Cut the pipe with the copper tube cutter and then sand the burrs off the end. Push the slip joint onto the pipe as far as you can. Then, while pressing the disconnect clip against the release collar on the slip end of the fitting, slide the fitting onto the other pipe so the short copper tube goes into the assembly push fitting, again to a depth of 1”. For more information on push fittings, see our video “Working with Plastic Pipe and Push Fittings.”

Since our electrical system is grounded to the water line, which is common in many homes, we need to install this copper jumper wire, which acts as a bridge over the plastic water filter. Without it, our system wouldn’t be properly grounded. These two clamps fasten on both sides of the filter directly onto the copper pipe. This jumper wire fits into these clamps. Simply tighten with a screwdriver.

Now, let’s install our water filter into the cartridge. We selected this filter cartridge because it not only removes sediment, but also improves the taste of water and removes odors. It also reduces other harmful impurities such as mercury and lead. Be sure to compare the different filter options available so you can choose the one that’s right for you.

Following the manufacturer’s instructions, we unscrew the housing from the head cap and place our new filter into the cartridge. Then screw it back on, making sure the O ring is seated level in the groove and that the new cartridge slips over the standpipe in the bottom of the cartridge housing. We’ll hand tighten the cartridge, slowing turning it counter clockwise. Finally, we’ll turn the water supply back on slowly and allow the cartridge to fill, checking for any leaks. That’s perfect.

So there you have it. Now you can get a refreshing glass of filtered water from any tap in the house. Not to mention how it improves the quality of the water used for other household needs. And all it took was some DIY advice from our local independent home improvement retailer.

Close Transcript

Send to Kindle


Read more from: How-To Videos > Plumbing

Back to top

29 responses to “How to Install a Whole House Water Filter”

  1. V.O. Varghese says:

    The water filter as shown in the video seems to be a good one that can be easily fitted for filtering the line water. Please let me know from where can I get such a filter. Please also indicate the cost of the same.

    V.O. Varghese.

  2. Gloria Gallini says:

    We have turned off the. Water, & opened all the valves in the house. Water continues to drip at the main . How do I stop this dripping?

    • qa says:

      The main shut off valve needs service. I doubt there are serviceable parts, and corrosion or scaling may be the cause so the replacement would be the solution. try working the valve repeatedly and see if that helps before going to the trouble and expense of replacing it. Bronze valves can last for decades.

  3. Vincent says:

    The whole process is clear. Such a whole house water is pretty good, especially in some area where water quality is poor or hard.

  4. Kenneth says:

    Why does Culligan say that the SUMP section of the water filter (Clear Housing) have to be CHANGED every 5 years if it is a Clear one or every 10 years if it is an opaque one?
    Is this a gimmick like the shampoo bottle that tells you to REPEAt washing your head to get it clean ? They have a Caution warning below the instructions on every culligan water filter that I buy..
    Can’t find any reason on the internet for changing sumps unless you had installed one that had BPA in the plastic back in the early 80’s..

  5. plantman says:

    my toilets definitely need filtered water in them. Thanks!

  6. Jason Forest says:

    thanks for sharing us your knowledge. we really need to have a good water purification system now that millions of people are dying from different diseases they acquired from drinking unfiltered water

    • qa says:

      Municipal water is constantly tested. A report of water quality testing is always available. drink the water from your tap. do not drink water from ponds. lakes etc unless purified. It is common to see people buying water and filling their own bottles from dispenser machines. this is simply tap water that is filtered. there is no reason to do this other than taste. It is much cheaper, and vertainly easier, to install yor own filter or filter your drinking water with a filtr such as Brita or PUR.

  7. Carmen says:

    Hi where can you buy this filter ,how much is the cost ??

  8. absone says:

    nice to see this post going to bookmark it that share it to others

  9. Nick Review says:

    nice Job here is my water filter How to Replace a Whole House Water Filter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I5lE9mmTnw

  10. Mike says:

    Very detailed video. The whole installing process is clear. I just need to install one and your tips help me a lot.

  11. Justin says:

    I just installed one of these 2night due to the one that was previously in line was really old and leaking. It went really easy. But now my water pressure is much worse than it was before. I followed all the directions and there are no leaks. So not really sure what I did wrong here.

  12. John Francis says:

    Thank you – I wish we could get these in South Africa – big problems with water quality here.

    One observation in your video. The Teflon tape should be wrapped on the thread in a clockwise direction – as you say, but you have put it on anti-clockwise direction, so it could unravel slightly during installation. My apologies – I cannot help noticing these things. 🙂

    • Danny says:

      If you were to look at the fitting itself straight on, it’s righty tighty. Which would mean the tape goes on clockwise in order to prevent unraveling during installation. He was correct.

  13. Paul says:

    What brand is the filter you used?
    I’m looking for one without a pressure relief button, and it appears that yours doesn’t have one.
    The last two I had installed leaked at the red button and could not be fixed. My water pressure is about 20 PSI less than the max pressure rating of the filters.The manufacturer was no help. Seems like a feature that is designed to fail, and really unnecessary since you can open a faucet and relieve the pressure to change cartridges.

    • Mark says:

      I have the same problem (leaking pressure relief button). I also want a filter with no pressure relief button. I haven’t been able to find one.

  14. maxim says:

    I need to know please, is it possible to install the filter upside down or horizontally ?

    • qa says:

      The housing is not designed to support the weight sideways. You would be asking for trouble.Consider what the consequences are for a cracked or worse housing under pressure. If you install it upside down the water will all fall out when ever the housing is removed. Messy and probably do-able but not desirable. I would make all possible changes to keep the filters in the design configuration.

  15. marie says:

    I am using a rainfresh filter, there is a white end and a blue end. Which side goes up and which down please. The blue end is open and the white end is closed. Right now I have the blue end down, told by the store, but I still have odor, does not seem to be doing anything.

  16. Hannah says:

    The popular and common water system is Reverse Osmosis. It will save your money for buying bottled water. The most famous and popular brand is APEC. There are various models in the market. In this APEC water reviews, we would like to offer you the best or top models in the market. Furhter more details- http://www.ewaterpurifier.com/top-rated-best-apec-water-review/

  17. Jeff Gilden says:

    We have the AquaOx from https://www.aquaoxfilters.com and we love it! Tastes like bottled water from every faucet in our house. Works great!

  18. Dan Searle says:

    What can you do if your water line is vertical?
    Could you T off or 90 degree a bypass line; then go up and back to the vertical line?

  19. Leon says:

    If you have a water pump should filter be installed before or after pump?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Current month ye@r day *